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[Solved] Air flow

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Hi Estelle

I have been practicing my warm up 0 and a few songs from essential elements.I think I have been holding back at bit because of my neighbours. I read a book last night about a students teacher that told him to blow harder ,he said I am. His teacher then pushed him over he got back up and he pushed him over again. I know it was not very nice but it did help him ,he never blew lightly again.

Watching people play you can not get the idea of how much air they are putting through the instrument. I was trying to play a middle g with the same amount of air for a low c. I am still having difficulty going above middle g from a lower partial. I have it ingrained in my brain that there is big steps between close partials.

Are the lip slur exercises the best thing to practice or is there something else I could combine.

 

Thanks Phil.

Steven Prizant 09/12/2021 6:38 pm

I'm sharing a previously answered email question with other members. I couldn't find a 'tag' labeled ''breathing'' or ''inhaling/inhalation'' ('exhalation') and don't know how to create a new tag, so I'm posting this Q & A here:

Question (12-6-21): when taking a breath/inhalation, do you suggest to breathe the air in on the sides of the mouth, or middle of the mouth, or where? Thanks

Answer (12-8-2021)
You should breathe through the corners of the mouth. Open the mouth up and down, use the tongue to block the mouthpiece opening so you don’t inhale trumpet air (gross), and breathe. It should feel free flowing. If not, then open up a bit more.
.... there are several different ways to breathe, but you shouldn’t concern yourself with that at this time. Focus on developing daily fundamentals, tone, putting the time in, and breathe as I stated earlier. It’s simply not necessary to know other types of breathing as they do not apply to beginners. There is already so much to think about and do, I have seen hundreds of students start down the rabbit hole of trumpet “things” only to lose the most important things; tone, air, relaxation, playing.
I hope that helps.....Estela

Steven Prizant 09/12/2021 6:58 pm

Estela, I have a quick follow up question. You answered:
"You should breathe through the corners of the mouth. Open the mouth up and down, use the tongue to block the mouthpiece opening so you don’t inhale trumpet air''.
Question: When you say open the mouth up, I found it more to my like to open the corners of the mouth and not the front where the aperture opening is (that you advised to block from breathing in the trumpet air). Is that what you had in mind - opening corners & not the middle-front? I'm thinking (could easily be mistaken) that if I were to open the middle/front of the mouth/lips where the aperture opening is, it would be tougher to get it reset quick enough to resume playing in comparison to opening the sides.

By the way, I found this hour long youtube video last night titled ''embouchure talk'' from 2006 where trumpeter Dave Len Scott interviews premiere Bay Area trumpeters about their embouchures and changes in their embouchures over the course of their professional careers. It begins with a visual comparison of lip flexibility, tonguing, and trumpet embouchures of the premiere San Francisco Bay Area performers of 2006. I felt better knowing almost all talked about times they were frustrated and disheartened and not achieving things desired.
Almost all stressed the importance of 'air' as paramount.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hc7P5lz4vho

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Hi Phil, see my response below. Happy practicing!

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