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[Solved] Double/Triple tonguing pronunciations

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Topic starter

Hi Estela,

I refer to Int. Video #14 +-5.50 into the video:

Life Goal/Main purpose of Multiple tonguing is to make the pronunciation the Same. I find this confusing. Why practice the other sounds if you want to make them sound the same. Why make the "Ku" pronunciation sound exactly like the "Tu" sound? Please clarify my misunderstanding. Thanks.

Regards Edwin.

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@edwinoldham
Hi Edwin, no worries. I will ask you this: can you tongue 16th notes at 142bpm? Set your metronome at 142bpm and try it.

You can’t. It’s too fast of a tempo. So...what do we do? Well, trumpet pedagogues invented another form of tonguing notes called double tonguing. With double tonguing we say tu-ku-tu-ku-tu which allows us to tongue notes MUCH faster. 

So now I go back to my question; can you single tongue 16th notes at 142bpm? No, you can not. But can one double tongue 16th notes at 142pm? YES. 

We need double tonguing to be able to tongue faster songs. Without this technique MUCH of the trumpet repertoire would be impossible for us to play. And it’s not just us, wind players of all sorts double and triple tongue too. With me so far? 

So now we know why we need to know the technique. But why make the tu and the ku sound the same? Well, if they don’t, the tonguing sounds sloppy...and simply very bad. It would sound like a mess of blurry notes. 

Listen to this here , 10 seconds in she is double tonguing those notes. The piece is too fast to single tongue. It sounds nice and clear, but if her tu and ku didn’t match it would sound like a mess. 

I hope that’s clear!

-Estela

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Hi Edwin, great question. The point of double and triple tonguing is to be able to tongue much faster than we can single tongue. For example let say you had to play 16th notes at 132bpm. Then you would need to double tongue. Making the syllables sound the same will make your double tonguing sound clear as day. We don’t use double tonguing for slower music. Only when notes are too fast for single tonguing. 

keep up the good work!

-Estela

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Topic starter

Good Morning Estela,

Thanks for your response. Bear with me as I am still unclear on this aspect.

Could you please expand on " Making the syllables sound the same will make your double tonguing sound  as clear as day." I have also consulted other Google explanations on Multiple tonguing, and they say the same eg "Make the TA's and KA's sound the same," to try to get a different perspective.

Why practice/use

the K sound (or Cu) when you want it to sound like a Tu? I am obviously not understanding the basic concept.

Thanks for your assistance.

Regards

Edwin Michael

 

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