Pick a Trumpet Case, Mouthpiece and More!

TORPEDO "COYOTE SNIP 2.5"

What to consider before buying a trumpet case

How many trumpets will you need to store? │ Is weight important to you? │ Do you need a hard or soft case? │ What look do you want? │ How much can you spend? │ Will you be storing your sheet music in the case? │ Would you like enough space to store mutes?

Did you know there are cases that can hold 4 trumpets?

There are also cases that hold 2, 3, 2.5 and 3.5. The “.5” is a piccolo trumpet. My Torpedo case for example holds 2.5 so I keep my Bb, C and pic in there. Because there is so much customizable space I can also put a straight mute in the case.

When shopping for a case make sure you think about the future! If you will go to college soon for a performance degree you will most likely need at least a double case for when you add a C trumpet to your arsenal. Also, if you are going to study jazz you will need a flugelhorn at some point. These horns are bigger than regular trumpets and will take up more space, so keep that in mind when shopping. The Torpedo “Coyote Snap” for example holds a Bb and a 10.5 inch tall flugel; a great case for a jazz musician.

☑ If you don’t know what a flugelhorn is go to the trumpets page and find out!

Just like anything else out there, you get what you pay for. As you become a full member of the trumpet community you will figure out which brands are worth it. Generally, more expensive means better materials and workmanship, which trust me is very important. In end, it’s better to spend a couple hundred on a case that will last you 8 years, than $40 on one that will fall apart in a few months. My suggestion is that you mostly stick to the brands listed here (which is not a conclusive list) and stay away from random things that pop-up on eBay. Years ago I bought a $30 bag from eBay…6 months later my trumpet had acquired strange, tiny, gray spots all over the section that touched the inside of the case. So, beware.

Gard • Gator Cases • Protec • Reunion Blues • Bach • Yamaha • Torpedo • Raw Brass (these can survive the apocalypse) • Marcus Bonna • BAM

Weight makes a big difference! You never know when you will have to park far away from the concert location, and hauling a super heavy case can leave you winded and take a toll on your first notes. I’ve personally always loved lightweight cases, but beware the protection may not be that great. I own a Torpedo Coyote on wheels, this way it’s lightweight and extremely well protected. Naturally, the less trumpets you have in your bag the lighter it will be. If weight is a big deal to you, go for a highly padded, fabric “gig bag” and be careful not to let anyone step on it or drop it. Gig bags are usually a one trumpet, lightweight bag. Pictured here is a Torpedo Outlaw which is a fantastic case and only weighs 3 pounds. If you’re on a budget check out a Wolfpak case at only $50. Practically all major brands make a lightweight case.

Need to store sheet music or other stuff? This can be very important to consider because if your case does not have space for sheet music or mutes then you will also need to carry a folder or pouch for music and a mute bag. Some cases will have a small compartment for sheet music, usually right under the trumpet. Other cases will have zippered areas on the outside. And yet other brands will have a separately purchased pouch which attaches to the case. Such is the case with the pictured Torpedo Classic Case, and you can easily see the pouch buckled on the left side of the case. You will also notice another bag attached to the right; the detachable mute bag. Special mute bags are nice because they keep your mutes from banging up against each other all the time, so I highly recommend them. Just do a google search for “trumpet mute bags.” As usual, be aware of your current and future needs!

If looks are important to you, then get ready to fork up! Even though a fancy case won’t make you play any better, some people still love the look of a light brown leather case with custom made buckles. Yep, that’s out there. Cases come in leather of all colors, and even combinations like red and cream. My only advice when shopping for a good looking case is make sure you are paying mostly for the protection and quality than for the look. Don’t get fooled into a $500, nice but cheaply made case.

Mouthpiece Pouches

Most cases have one or two slots for a mouthpiece, however, you may find yourself without enough space. If so, never ever put a mouthpiece in a “free roam” area where it can hit and dent your horn! Also, don’t throw it in your book bag or purse as it will get damaged and damage your other items too. Instead, purchase a mouthpiece pouch. They can hold from one to 8 mouthpieces safely in their own slot. Most main retailers and trumpet case makers also make mouthpiece pouches.

Sheet Music Bags

If your case has no space for sheet music you can either carry your music in a folder or in a sheet music bag. Carrying it in a folder works well if you just have a few sheets of music. If you overload the folder you run the risk of dropping and seeing your entire pile of music scattered on the floor…possibly in the rain if you’re unlucky :). I love sheet music bags because it’s easy to neatly store my music, carry pencils, a metronome and even heavy books. Look around online for something that suits your needs and style.

Mute Bags

These bags are especially designed to carry mutes and are sometimes seen attached to cases with buckles. Some will have one large compartment where you can place several mutes, while others will have separated areas for each mute. When buying a mute bag pay attention to how snug the mutes will fit since you don’t want them rattling around. Another important factor is having a shoulder strap for when your hands are full. Which ever bag you go for should have one main focus: mute safety.